24 February 2017

A New Version of an Old Favorite

 
Shooters will get it.
 
:^)


Wild Bill: "The Cross and the Shield"


Much Ado About Nothing

Officials at Chugiak High School have decided to prohibit the display of the Confederate flag on school grounds, except for the purpose of historical learning.
About 2,000 parents and students received an email this week from the principal, explaining the new policy to ban certain uses of the flag. 
The email said in part, "because of the substantial disruption to our school environment and the likelihood of future disruption, the Confederate flag will not be displayed at our high school except in the context of the study of the Civil War." 
The decision was sparked after five students were seen on social media posing in front of a Confederate flag on school grounds.  
The school principal wrote, since the incident, Chugiak High became the subject of local and national media attention.  
The principal said the decision to ban uses of the flag was made to ensure all students attending the school “feel safe, secure and … have a sense of belonging.”
 
So these snowflakes* have decided to be offended by a historical emblem. While I admit being curious what the students intended by the display, it's just a flag. Are they attempting to rally forces to a States' rights cause? It seems unlikely.
 
They're products of the modern educational system, which barely deserves the title. So it's nearly impossible to know what they think the flag stands for. But they're also teenagers, so it's as likely as any other reason to be simply to make waves, and garner attention. They certainly got that.
 
But to ban a Confederate flag on school grounds? Once again, we're sending entirely the wrong message to a generation growing up in a bubble-wrap environment, leaving them woefully unprepared for real life.
 
And we've already seen the results of that, since election day last November.
 
 
* Yes, I'm referring to the principal and other school officials, in this case. There are probably parents who support the ban, so it would include them, too.

23 February 2017

The End of an Era

When we moved to Alaska, nearly 15 years ago, there was one aspect of the change which hadn't been on the radar until we arrived.
 
Back in the St. Louis area, we enjoyed the baseball Cardinals, the Rams (they were doing well, at the time), and the Blues. We took professional sports teams for granted; they're everywhere, right?
 
Except ... not so much.
 
Alaska didn't then, and still doesn't, have any big-league sports teams. The closest thing was the Alaska Aces, a farm-league hockey team in Anchorage.
 
Now, after ongoing financial woes, the Aces will soon be no more.
The end of this hockey season will double as the end of the Alaska Aces. 
The state's only professional sports franchise, a three-time winner of the ECHL's Kelly Cup, announced Thursday morning that it will cease operations after 14 seasons on the circuit two steps below the NHL.

I grew up watching, and occasionally attending, Cardinals baseball. Not a rabid fan, and never the type who could tell you the shoe and jumper sizes the players wore, still I enjoyed the games. I even attended a game the week before we moved, having the privilege of seeing it from a private box at the old Busch Stadium in its final season.

Sidebar: I attended a game in '66, in that stadium's inaugural season. Watched Orlando Cepeda hit a grand slam against the Mets.

Anyway, while never been a hockey fan, I feel badly for the local fans who never miss an Aces game. I feel your pain, folks.